Contact Us

REUSE, RECYCLE, RE PURPOSE SERIES

Do you have any old gadgets or interesting things that you just can't throw away?. Do you wonder if these things can be used for something else? I have a curiosity to use traditional things in non traditional ways. After looking here if you have something you'd like me to try to "Re Purpose" let me know. Here is what I've been up to lately.

First came the Mashers

When I first came upon the pattern for a basket using the potato masher as a handle, I was intrigued by the use of old objects in basketry.

I have hunted down many a masher (as have friends and students) and woven dozens of rectangular small market style baskets using the masher as a handle.

A year ago a friend gave me a masher with a round base, and I found several with square bases in Virginia City Nevada. These different bases lent themselves to round and square baskets.


The photo's here show finished baskets with mashers for handles in 3 shapes.

1. A square basket

2. A round spoked basket

3. Rectangular Baskets

Click Here to Add a Title

This square basket measured about 7" x 7" square with sides about 4" tall.

Click Here to Add a Title

This round spoked basket

was 7" in diameter with sides about 3" tall. 

Click Here to Add a Title

The holes in the masher were perfect for attaching the stakes in a circular manner.

The base of the basket is shown here..

Click Here to Add a Title

These are the rectangular masher baskets made wtih the more common masher base. The back and forth squiggles.

Recycling Exploring the possibilities with Metal

I am curious, I have begun a hunt for old things, to try to incorporate into a basket. I have collected an array of gadgets, mostly kitchen at this point that I am going to weave into, onto or through. 

Re Purposing

As I scoured antique stores, junk shops and the salvation army I found some things that just begged to come home to my basket studio. Among those things are an old goat yoke and several stoneware lids.


These stoneware lids range in size from 3" diameter to 10" diameter. 2 are flat on the underside, the other 2 are made with a lip, or an extension so when placed on, the extension will sit inside the base opening, helping it to stay on.


These are the finished baskets using the three little lids, they each sit on a lip and fit snugly inside the inside rim.


WHAT IS THAT?

A friend gave me a wire basket measuring about 6" across. the bottom was woven like a square base. The sides had the "spoke" ends extending up to the rim There was no additional wire "fill". On the base, the, 4 corners have a spoke bent outward in a little bump to create a foot. Anyway, she thought I might find a re-use for it. It took a while but eventually I wove the sides first in alternating rows of natural and dyed reed. I followed the over under manner using the wires as spokes. I then proceeded to fill the base from corner to corner and wove the ends up, over under the side rows. The wire rim is covered by the reed rim. I managed to keep the little feet free so it still sits on it's feet.

Recycling Exploring the possibilities with Metal

As I get these incorporated into baskets I will add the photo's here, Some I may write patterns for.

I will post here and on the Pattern Page if I do.

Click Here to Add a Title

This is an old Goat yolk.

I have already attached an oval hoop with a Gods Eye of smoked reed. This frame will become a ribbed basket. This yolk is about 2 feet tall. 

Click Here to Add a Title

This is the Goat Yolk basket, (frame above), finally finished

Weavers used are dyed flat, dyed round, dyed sea grass and natural reed.

THE WIRE WHIP/SPOON

This is one of the hex woven spoons on the table above. 

 They hang from the wire handle or sit flat. hover over the photo to see it larger

THE WIRE CARRIER

This is one of the wire carriers as shown on the table. It is divided into 4 sections. I have incorporated the framing into the side weaving and into the lashing. The sides could be made taller and the rim would sit totally above the wire frame. This is ok if the handle clearance is taller.

Strange find

This is one of the wire carriers as shown on the table. It is divided into 4 sections. I have incorporated the framing into the side weaving and into the lashing. The sides could be made taller and the rim would sit totally above the wire frame. This is ok if the handle clearance is taller.

Click Here to Add a Title

This is what I think is a potato masher, I found this along with the traditional style masher in an antique store. The metal masher is quite thick and stiff. It appears to have been created this way, any attempts I made to flatten it, were futile. I have woven this into the base of the basket. To center the handle I had to weave the slotted end to one side of the base.

Click Here to Add a Title

This is what I think is a potato masher, I found this along with the traditional style masher in an antique store. The metal masher is quite thick and stiff. It appears to have been created this way, any attempts I made to flatten it, were futile. I have woven this into the base of the basket. To center the handle I had to weave the slotted end to one side of the base.

The tomato slicer and the flat grater

This is one of the wire carriers as shown on the table. It is divided into 4 sections. I have incorporated the framing into the side weaving and into the lashing. The sides could be made taller and the rim would sit totally above the wire frame. This is ok if the handle clearance is taller.

THE WIRE CARRIER

I have woven reed through the grid on the grater, upset inside the outer edge and woven a low sided basket, With the tomato slicer, I first flattened the slicing blades. They were still sharp. This allowed the stakes to pass without getting eaten.

Wire Fry basket

I have woven reed through the grid on the grater, upset inside the outer edge and woven a low sided basket, With the tomato slicer, I first flattened the slicing blades. They were still sharp. This allowed the stakes to pass without getting eaten.

The Fish Turner

I have woven reed through the grid on the grater, upset inside the outer edge and woven a low sided basket, With the tomato slicer, I first flattened the slicing blades. They were still sharp. This allowed the stakes to pass without getting eaten.

THE WIRE CARRIER

The graduated width of this piece required some creative base stake placement. Twining around the base helped define the contours of the turner and held the base stakes in place for side weaving

IS THAT A WIRE SOAP DISH?

I have woven reed through the grid on the grater, upset inside the outer edge and woven a low sided basket, With the tomato slicer, I first flattened the slicing blades. They were still sharp. This allowed the stakes to pass without getting eaten.

THE WIRE CARRIER

My husband found this while I was scouring a shop for mashers, graters etc. We think it might have been a soap dish...really have no idea if that is correct. The shop owner was clueless as well. It was not deep, barely an inch so I wove the stakes thru the base and the entire basket inside the wire framing.

The "Fork"

This is one of those huge tine forks, I believe made for turning a large roast, or turkey. The photo on the left is the front of the basket, The one on the lright is the back showing how the fork is incorporated into the weaving. The large loop handle was rather plain so I added the weaving as an accent

The Cake Slicer

My mother in law used this type of "knife" to slice an angel food cake, I imagine it could have been used to hold anything that needed to be sliced in narrow slices. It has become the handle and divider for this Peanut basket! The dividing wall is woven through the tines and the ends of those weavers are then woven along with the outside weavers. When the rim was lashed the handle was secured to the rim with an X and on the other end the lasher catches the outermost tine as it passes over the inside rim..